Jean Chauvin

Jean Chauvin

    Over Jean Chauvin

    French artist Jean Chauvin (1889–1976) is considered one of the pioneers of abstract sculpture of the early 20th century. In 1908, at the age of 19, he arrived in Paris and entered the École des Arts Décoratifs. He then went to the École des Beaux Arts in the studio of the sculptor Antonin Mercié. Between 1913 and 1920, Chauvin took part in the Salon d'automne and the Salon des indépendants while working in Joseph Bernard's studio where he participated in the carving of the Dance Frieze (now in the Musée d'Orsay). A member of the Salon d'automne, he also exhibited two sculptures there in 1928. Definitely moving towards abstract sculpture, he was noticed by the collector Jacques Doucet who bought a sculpture from him. In 1928 Chauvin made his first exhibition in Paris. He was taken over by Jeanne Bucher under his own name and exhibited there until her death in 1947. During these years he became friends with Robert Rey, who was to become the director of the Arts Plastiques in 1944, as well as with Jean Cassou, founder of the Musée National d'Art Moderne. From 1947 to 1955, under the aegis of Cécile Goldscheider (curator of the Rodin Museum), he exhibited in Bern (Switzerland), Prague (Czechoslovakia), Amsterdam (Netherlands), Stockholm (Sweden), Düsseldorf (Germany), etc. In 1949, he had a private exhibition at the Maeght Gallery (Paris). Several exhibitions followed until the end of his life. Notably, he represented France during the 1962 Biennale of Venice.